Frequently Asked Questions

Read the most commonly asked questions regarding our professional Lawn Care services.

Company Questions:

No, you will never sign a contract for any of our services. You can cancel at any time.

We charge for all services when they have been completed. We do this on the Wednesday following the service.

Yes, we send an email the day before all services are performed. This email will outline what we are applying to the lawn and some care instructions for the lawn. If you request we can call you to let you know we are coming. 

Our goal is to treat your lawn within 7 business days of getting your payment information. We will treat your lawn with a special blend that starts to control weeds. There are times of the year where this could take longer if weather delays us or during the spring when large volumes of new clients sign up. 

We prefer you to email [email protected] or call 704-822-1625. This will go directly to our office and get your question answered in a timely manner.

We use a technology that allows us to precisely measure your turf. If we can’t see your lawn online we will visit your property and get an accurate measurement.

We take 6-8 pictures of your lawn at each visit. These pictures are uploaded to your account and kept for the entire time you are our client. This allows our managers to review the history of your property. This is helpful when diagnosing issues that can occur. 

Turf Questions:

We tell clients that it takes 12-18 months to turn a lawn around. I will expand on this more and break it down by grass as well.

  • Fescue Turf: Fescue turf is typically grown from seed. Depending on how healthy your turf is when you start determines how long it will take for your turf to be thick and lush.
    • Bare and New Lawns (18-24 months): If you have little to no turf when we begin I would expect you would be in the 18-24 months range. This time frame usually allows for us to seed the lawn over two fall seasons and build a turf with a strong healthy root system. Proper watering and fungicides in the summer months will improve the overall health of your fescue. The key to healthy fescue lawns is not losing any turf during the summer stress. Heat and Drought are a big issue for fescue but fungus damage is the biggest culprit when losing fescue turf in the summer. Our fungicide program can reduce the amount of turf lost during this time. If you keep 80-90% of your turf after the first summer that turf will be stronger in the 2nd summer and able to handle the heat and drought conditions in the future. If you are starting over in large areas of your lawn each fall you will stay in that cycle each year and not enjoy your fescue lawn as much.
    • Healthy but weedy fescue turf (6-12 months): If you have healthy turf but it is weedy we will be able to make major improvements in 6-12 months. If we start in the late winter it will take less time because we can prevent most of the summer weeds that cause issues for lawns. If you start after March 15th we can still help you but we will be fighting weeds that first summer since we missed a key deadline for pre-emergents. During the first 6 months, we will be building key nutrients in your soil that will benefit your existing turf and preparing your soil for fall seeding.
  • Bermuda and Zoysia Turf: Most warm-season lawns take 3-6 months to see improvements. This is due to the fact that warm-season turf is established from sod and these grasses are spreaders and have the ability to heal themselves. They will easily spread 6-12 inches in a season. It is important to understand that we do not seed these turf grasses. If you have large bare areas you will need to sod these areas to get the best results. Our program is designed to take a sodded warm-season lawn and build health and control weeds.

The piedmont of NC is a transition zone for turfgrass. That means that there isn’t one grass that dominates and does well 12 months per year. There are a few factors to consider when selecting a turfgrass for your lawn. Fescue is the only grass that grows in NC that establishes well from seed. You will typically see this turf used in larger lawns where sodding would be cost prohibited. Also, Fescue is technically green 12 months per year which is a plus for some clients. Fescue is a bunch grass and will not spread or heal itself if any damage occurs to it. It will need to be seeded in the fall to fix any damaged areas. Fescue does require more care to achieve optimal results but it is more cost-effective to establish when compared to Bermuda and Zoysia. Bermuda and Zoysia are grasses that are established from sod and need to have at least 6 hours of direct sunlight to thrive. They are spreading grasses so they will usually grow out of any damage caused by fungus or drought. They have a period from November to Late April where they are dormant and have a brown or yellow color to them but they will thrive in the heat when fescue usually struggles.

A healthy weed-free lawn will always be maintained on a routine program. Mother Nature will always try and take back your lawn. Leaving a lawn untreated for 12-24 months will undo any previous services you have done.

 

Soil issues do exist but we have found that our program addresses most issues. If we fill it is needed we can pull a soil sample to address issues we see. Our program is timed to treat the lawn at the right time and while some homeowners have success doing their own lawn we find that most miss timely treatments that are crucial for success. Our teams will not miss the key dates and our product is applied at the right rates based on the square footage of your lawn. We find that most homeowners don’t know the exact size of their lawn or how much product to apply. This can be environmentally unfriendly and damaging to the health of the turf

 
  • Fescue: Fescue should be cut 3.5” – 4”. NC State studied the effect of keeping the turf maintain at 3.5” and found that crabgrass didn’t germinate in healthy turf when maintained at this height while fescue cut below 3” had 60-70% of the turf infested with crabgrass. Also, fescue will handle summer temperatures better when kept above 3.5”
  • Bermuda: Bermuda should be cut at 1-2” for best results. This is not possible if you use a large mower or have an uneven lawn. For uneven lawns you may have to cut it at 2.5” or higher. The longer the blade the less green the blade will be. This is because the grass shades out the bottom of the blade turning it brown. If you notice your Bermuda lawn has brown spots after mowing you are likely cutting it too high or not frequently enough.
  • Zoysia: In the last 20 years, a number of zoysiagrass cultivars have been released. These cultivars, such as El Toro, Crowne, Palisades, Empire, Atlantic, and Jamur, are coarser in texture (similar to newer tall fescues) and are quicker to establish and recover from injury. They are not as cold tolerant as Meyer and should not be mowed as short as Emerald and Meyer. Cavalier, Zeon, Zorro, Geo, and Leisure Time are new zoysiagrass cultivars with a moderate growth rate and a fine texture similar to Emerald. Cold tolerance of zoysia is not a problem in North Carolina’s piedmont. If you have a variety that has a coarse-textured blade you should mow it at 3”. If you have a fine-textured blade of zoysia you should mow it at or around 2”.

We visit lawns 7-10 times per year based on which services you sign up for. Our basic fertilization and weed control program is 7 visits which happen every 5 weeks from January to September and one additional visit in Late October-November

 

No, you have hired a professional company and you will not need to supplement our program. Also, you may harm your lawn or negatively impact our program by using your products. All of our treatments are specially blended and applied according to the product label. Adding additional products would be environmentally unfriendly

 

Call us and let us know. We will be happy to stop by and treat these weeds at no additional charge. That is our commitment to all clients. We will do free service visits between our regularly scheduled visits to control pesky weeds. Some weeds take a few extra treatments and we understand this. We asked that you give us 14 days after a visit to make sure that the products have had time to work. There are many reasons a weed doesn’t die. Rain could have impacted the visit, the route manager could have easily missed an area, or you could have a mature weed that needs more than one visit to control. We need and want to know if you have weeds and we want to make sure we do everything we can to control them

 
 

We would like a minimum of 24 hours but 48 hours is better. 1-2 days is enough time for the product to start working on the turf.

 
 

We do our best to avoid treating when we expect rainfall. Unfortunately, forecasting weather is hard for the experts and sadly we are going to treat and get a rain shower at the most inopportune time. For the majority of the products we apply, we need to have them watered in for them to benefit the lawn. Fertilizers and pre-emergents especially need to be watered in after a visit. Herbicides used to control existing weeds need to have approximately 1-2 hours of dry time for them to be most effective. After they have dried we need to water the turf so the weeds will take up the herbicide and the control can begin. Remember We offer free weed control between visits so we asked that you allow 10-14 days to see what dies. If we need to apply more we don’t mind but we also want to be environmentally friendly with our herbicide usage. Rain isn’t going to wash 100% of the control away so let’s see what happens and react once we know for sure.

 

Not normally. We suggest cutting weekly during Mid-March-October and mulching or discharging the clippings back in the lawn. This is called grasscycling and is healthy for the turf. The clippings have nutrients in them that will breakdown and feed the existing turf. If you have to skip a cutting or get behind and are removing too much grass then bagging is necessary to avoid leaving clumps of turf and causing damage.

Fescue Turf Questions:

We can sign up a new client during any month of the year and turn a lawn around in 12-18 months. However, having at least 1-2 months before September to get the weeds under control will allow more room for fescue seed to germinate and you will have a more successful fall seeding. Starting in the early spring allows us to prevent weeds and build fertility in the soil which will benefit the fall seeding. If you sign up in September don’t worry, we can still seed over the weeds you have. While this isn’t the best approach you will get seed to germinate and our program will prevent these weeds next spring and your fall seeding the next year will fill any small areas that don’t do well. I think it is important to remember that it can take 12-18 months and there really isn’t a way to speed this process up. It takes time to build nutrients in the soil, grow new turf, and prevent weeds.

It is not likely. While some areas could have washed a little it would be virtually impossible for all of the seed we applied to the lawn to wash away. Also, we do touch-up seeding before and during our winter fertilization visit. This ensures that we catch those areas that could have washed. Our experience tells us that about 90-95% of the seed stayed where we want it and will germinate. We can easily hit the areas that washed with more seed.

 

Applying straw to your lawn will cause wheat seeds to germinate and mix with your fescue. This isn’t a long-term problem but will be unsightly in the spring as the wheat straw will grow twice as fast as the fescue. When the summer temps reach 85 degrees consistently the wheat straw will burn out. Also, the straw doesn’t help the fescue germinate any better so we do not recommend using it.

 

No, This is likely a fungus call Brown Patch. If you notice circular spots contact us immediately to get control. Prevention is the best plan of action for fungus. We offer a 4 treatment plan to prevent Brown Patch. Drought stress will not show in a circular pattern but large areas of turf will turn brown. Drought-stressed grass stands up whereas fungal-damaged turf will lay over flat

 

If you don’t have a healthy stand of fescue turf when you start with us your lawn will actually get worse before it gets better. Here is why. We are preventing and killing weeds that have likely been the majority of your lawn. This creates large bare areas that will be seeded in the fall. It is easier and less expensive to control these weeds over the spring and summer season than to try and kill them at one time. Also, we are building fertility and changing the soil profile which will benefit the fall seeding as well.

 

You likely have poa annua in your fescue. Poa is common in fescue lawns. It germinates from seed like your fescue grass. In fact, all of the work we do for your fescue seed to succeed in the fall helps the poa grow too. It is difficult to control because the things we would use to control it hurt fescue too. That’s the bad news. The good news is that it will burn out when temperatures reach 80 degrees consistently. There is a control we can use in November that will help minimize Poa in the spring. We have to know your lawn has the issue before we recommend this which usually means you have to experience a spring of this pesky weed. Once we know you have the issue we can put you on a special 2 treatment program to help control this in the future. Usually, 2-3 seasons can eradicate this weed.

 

Wiregrass or Common Bermuda is native to our area. Fescue clients will see this grass thrive in hot sunny areas. Roundup will not kill this grass! We offer a combination of products that when sprayed in August will start to control this grass. This option takes 3-4 seasons to shrink and control common Bermuda grass

Bermuda and Zoysia Turf Questions:

Bermuda will begin to grow and turn green each spring when the air temperature consistently reaches above 60 degrees and the soil temperatures reach 65. The area of your lawn that faces south will green up a few days before the areas that face North. Bermuda will not fully green up and grow until we are consistently seeing 70 degree days and temps above 60 in the evening. It is actually high evening temperatures that impact the green-up more than the high daytime temperatures. Anyone with a warm-season turf wants green grass in the spring. We understand but it is important to remember that warm temperatures are what it takes to achieve this. Zoysia turf will routinely be 1-3 weeks behind Bermuda turf when it greens up in the spring.

 

These turfgrasses thrive in the summer heat but it is a myth that they don’t need water. If you want your turf to thrive and be at its best it will need to be watered during the summer especially during times of drought. We recommend watching the turf and looking for signs of stress and watering when the grass needs water

 
  • Bermuda and Zoysia Turf: Most warm-season lawns take 3-6 months to see improvements. This is due to the fact that warm-season turf is established from sod and these grasses are spreaders and have the ability to heal themselves. They will easily spread 6-12 inches in a season. It is important to understand that we do not seed these turf grasses. If you have large bare areas you will need to sod these areas to get the best results. Our program is designed to take a sodded warm-season lawn and build health and control weeds
  • Bermuda: Bermuda should be cut at 1-2” for best results. This is not possible if you use a large mower or have an uneven lawn. For uneven lawns you may have to cut it at 2.5” or higher. The longer the blade the less green the blade will be. This is because the grass shades out the bottom of the blade turning it brown. If you notice your Bermuda lawn has brown spots after mowing you are likely cutting it too high or not frequently enough.
  • Zoysia: In the last 20 years, a number of zoysiagrass cultivars have been released. These cultivars, such as El Toro, Crowne, Palisades, Empire, Atlantic, and Jamur, are coarser in texture (similar to newer tall fescues) and are quicker to establish and recover from injury. They are not as cold tolerant as Meyer and should not be mowed as short as Emerald and Meyer. Cavalier, Zeon, Zorro, Geo, and Leisure Time are new zoysiagrass cultivars with a moderate growth rate and a fine texture similar to Emerald. Cold tolerance of zoysia is not a problem in North Carolina’s piedmont. If you have a variety that has a coarse-textured blade you should mow it at 3”. If you have a fine-textured blade of zoysia you should mow it at or around 2”.

Still have questions? Contact our lawn care team today for the answers!

We try to cover all of the most common questions we get about our lawn care services, but sometimes you may have more. We want to answer any questions you may have, so if you don’t see what you’re looking for her, give our team of lawn care experts a call at (704) 822-1625.